Shame and Social Engineering

Just fin­ished read­ing So You’ve Been Pub­licly Shamed, Jon Ronson’s zeit­geisty book about social media pile-ons. There were many, many good points in the book, but I for­got to high­light them as I was enjoy­ing read­ing it so much. One thing that has stuck in my mind, how­ev­er, is an email exchange with the film-mak­er Adam Cur­tis, in which he talks about feed­back loops and the social media echo cham­ber:

Feed­back is an engi­neer­ing prin­ci­ple, and all engi­neer­ing is devot­ed to try­ing to keep the thing you are build­ing sta­ble.

It’s unde­ni­ably true that I now self-cen­sor a lot more on Twit­ter than I did in the past, for fear of a strong neg­a­tive reac­tion. I don’t think I’m alone in this; anec­do­tal evi­dence sug­gests many peo­ple are also becom­ing more tame to avoid the Twit­ter mobs. The net effect is, as Jon Ron­son him­self says:

We see our­selves as non­con­formist, but I think all of this is cre­at­ing a more con­formist, con­ser­v­a­tive age. ‘Look!’ we’re say­ing. ‘WERE nor­mal! THIS is the aver­age!’

I rec­om­mend you read the book your­self to see all of this in much greater con­text. And I won­der if Twit­ter and Face­book shouldn’t give away a free copy to all their users.